am i saying the right things?


Kelechi, 22. Screenwriter & Clueless enthusiast.

yagazieemezi:

Life in Pictures: Solange Knowles

For the latest edition of “Life in Pictures,” the 28-year-old singer allowed photographer Charlotte Hornsby to follow her around for four days, as she headed to an Airbnb rental in the Louisiana countryside to work on her upcoming album, then traveled to another one in Austin for SXSW.

(via solesoffire)

The Official Home of Mediocre Screenwriter Geoff LaTulippe » WANT TO WRITE A SCRIPT IN SIX WEEKS?

Straight Down Low is a neo-noir set in the inner city— A shrewd high school detective must solve a curious gangland crime to protect the girl he loves.

Director: Zach Wechter | Written by: Jack Seidman and Zach Wechter
Producer: Aubrey Davis | Director of Photography: Mishka Kornai
Starring: Shamar Sanders, Danièle Watts, Jules Theodore, Matias Ponce

Basically, if Nancy Drew was a black kid from the inner city. This short is interestingly shot and pretty engaging, check it out!

lettilove asked: How have you managed creating while working so much? Do you have a strict schedule? Do prompts? Any tips would be awesome!

Hey, 

I’ve actually been doing a pretty poor job of balancing work with writing, so I’m probably not the best person to ask about this. It’s just really hard to write when you’re exhausted from a 40+ hr work week, you know? But, what I’m slowly trying to force myself to do is find the empty spaces in my day and use them to write. I get creative and write outlines/ideas on my phone during breaks, then email them to myself so I can work on them when I get to a computer. I write in my notebook for a half hour before I go to bed. I use my off days (like today) to respond to emails and set up meetings/phone calls with my producers, and make a schedule of everything that needs to be done in the next few weeks.

It sounds way more organized and impressive written down than it is in execution, but I’m trying and I’m learning as I go. I’m always thinking about writing, and stressing over not doing enough of it, but I feel like I’m slowly discovering a system that works for me. For now, at least.

imwithkanye:

Elaine Stritch, Tart-Tongued Broadway Actress and Singer, Is Dead at 89 | NYT
Plainspoken, egalitarian, impatient with fools and foolishness, and admittedly fond of cigarettes, alcohol and late nights — she finally gave up smoking and drinking in her 60s — though she took it up again — Ms. Stritch might be the only actor to work as a bartender after starring on Broadway, and she was completely unabashed about her good-time-girl attitude.
“I’m not a bit opposed to your mentioning in this article that Frieda Fun here has had a reputation in the theater, for the past five or six years, for drinking,” she said to a reporter for The New York Times in 1968. “I drink and I love to drink, and it’s part of my life.”
[more]

imwithkanye:

Elaine Stritch, Tart-Tongued Broadway Actress and Singer, Is Dead at 89 | NYT

Plainspoken, egalitarian, impatient with fools and foolishness, and admittedly fond of cigarettes, alcohol and late nights — she finally gave up smoking and drinking in her 60s — though she took it up again — Ms. Stritch might be the only actor to work as a bartender after starring on Broadway, and she was completely unabashed about her good-time-girl attitude.

“I’m not a bit opposed to your mentioning in this article that Frieda Fun here has had a reputation in the theater, for the past five or six years, for drinking,” she said to a reporter for The New York Times in 1968. “I drink and I love to drink, and it’s part of my life.”

[more]

My new job allows me to buy really nice clothes, but I work 5-6 days out of the week and have to wear a uniform, so I never get a chance to wear them. :((((

britticisms:

I wish it was as easy for me to move someplace else as it is for so many of my friends. They see other places as chances, as means to an end, as an extension of what they want in the world. But I see them as impenetrable forces. I’ve never visited a city that I didn’t love. Because I can not imagine myself within them permanently, I instead feel appreciative of what they offer. If I were to dig deeper though (and by deeper, I mean deeper within myself), I would need to escape and quickly. 

When we talk about new writers who are writing and people say, “Oh, everything seems on the nose,” or, “There’s not enough subtext,” in a weird way, I think the mistake people are making is that they’re writing people and those people aren’t lying. They’re writing truth-tellers, and it’s just less interesting.

In the latest episode of the Scriptnotes’ podcast, Craig Mazin makes this point about the importance of crafting characters who are liars. We as writers have a specific vision when we write, and it’s tempting to be too direct in dialogue in order to hammer home points we’re afraid might otherwise get lost. However, this often strains the credibility of the world in which our scripts take place. In reality, people are rarely (vocally) honest about their intentions, feelings, desires, fears, etc. In general, we’re socialized to avoid over-sharing and internalize our issues. Because of this, I would take Craig’s point a step further and argue that characters who lie should be the default. It’s possible to write interesting, well-crafted characters who are brutally honest, but that should be something we knowingly put into their character to set them apart from the others in our scripts.

The ways and reasons characters lie, either to themselves or to others, allow the audience to form a more personal connection, and show us what’s going on inside their heads instead of straight up telling us. For example, BOB asks EMMA “How are you?” after she has just been dumped and fired from her job in the same day. EMMA could say, “I’m feeling really depressed. I don’t think I’ll make rent this month and now I’m terrified I’ll never find love,” OR, she could say, “I’m fine,” before we see her get black-out drunk and married in Vegas, or rob a bank at gunpoint. The first option is straightforward, but the second tells us way more about Emma’s character and provides opportunities for more visual scenes. Like Craig says, lying is just more interesting.