am i saying the right things?

Kelechi, 23. Screenwriter & Clueless enthusiast.

I remember the first time I read “Hoops,” by Walter Dean Myers, because it was literally a life-changing moment for me. I was about 12 years old and a voracious reader—the kind of kid whose parents checked beneath their pillows at night to make sure she wasn’t smuggling books to read after lights out (I was). The point is, I REALLY loved to read. And what came naturally, was an equally intense love of writing. I filled dozens of notebooks with stories and traded them to the other kids in my classes for candy. I had a small following of classmates who waited impatiently for new installments of my Dawson’s Creek-style dramas I was hardly qualified to write. 

But with Walter Dean Myers, it was the first time I realized the characters in my stories could be black. I was 12-years-old, and this was the first time I was exposed to fully-fleshed black kids who were the focus of their own stories. I remember being shocked, honestly, as I looked back at my own writing, at the characters described with “strawberry blonde hair and blue eyes,” and for the first time realized that I could instead be writing about girls who looked like me. 

Since then, I purposefully sought out stories about about black or poc characters, and my writing changed completely. My eyes were open to the lack of diversity in the books and media that I loved, and I developed a specific interest in writing about black girls living regular lives. With my transition to screenwriting, I became even more vigilant about keeping that theme in my scripts.

That is why I am so, SO excited to share with you the Indiegogo campaign for my short film, “Check Yes or No.” I wrote this film because I wanted to tell a familiar story—one’s first kiss—through the lens of a character we haven’t really seen before, and I’m so happy with how it has turned out. I’m also insanely grateful for the support it’s received thus far, both from Steeltown and you guys who helped it win a $5,000 grant! You guys are awesome, seriously.

In order to pay for the film, we’re asking for donations to our Indiegogo (https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/check-yes-or-no) to contribute to our budget. Your money will go toward paying for cast and crew (we’re working with children so we have to make sure they’re taken care of), production & post, and festival submission fees. Steeltown has offered to match the first thousand raised, so help us get there!! We also have some fun perks to offer. 

This project is so important to me, and I’m so excited to be able to share this with you guys. I’m even more excited to be able to show you the finished project!! 

Thanks & boost!!!!

I remember the first time I read “Hoops,” by Walter Dean Myers, because it was literally a life-changing moment for me. I was about 12 years old and a voracious reader—the kind of kid whose parents checked beneath their pillows at night to make sure she wasn’t smuggling books to read after lights out (I was). The point is, I REALLY loved to read. And what came naturally, was an equally intense love of writing. I filled dozens of notebooks with stories and traded them to the other kids in my classes for candy. I had a small following of classmates who waited impatiently for new installments of my Dawson’s Creek-style dramas I was hardly qualified to write.

But with Walter Dean Myers, it was the first time I realized the characters in my stories could be black. I was 12-years-old, and this was the first time I was exposed to fully-fleshed black kids who were the focus of their own stories. I remember being shocked, honestly, as I looked back at my own writing, at the characters described with “strawberry blonde hair and blue eyes,” and for the first time realized that I could instead be writing about girls who looked like me.

Since then, I purposefully sought out stories about about black or poc characters, and my writing changed completely. My eyes were open to the lack of diversity in the books and media that I loved, and I developed a specific interest in writing about black girls living regular lives. With my transition to screenwriting, I became even more vigilant about keeping that theme in my scripts.

That is why I am so, SO excited to share with you the Indiegogo campaign for my short film, “Check Yes or No.” I wrote this film because I wanted to tell a familiar story—one’s first kiss—through the lens of a character we haven’t really seen before, and I’m so happy with how it has turned out. I’m also insanely grateful for the support it’s received thus far, both from Steeltown and you guys who helped it win a $5,000 grant! You guys are awesome, seriously.

In order to pay for the film, we’re asking for donations to our Indiegogo (https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/check-yes-or-no) to contribute to our budget. Your money will go toward paying for cast and crew (we’re working with children so we have to make sure they’re taken care of), production & post, and festival submission fees. Steeltown has offered to match the first thousand raised, so help us get there!! We also have some fun perks to offer.

This project is so important to me, and I’m so excited to be able to share this with you guys. I’m even more excited to be able to show you the finished project!!

Thanks & boost!!!!

lora-does-things:

stars-collected:


Michael Brown was an 18 year old that was killed by a Ferguson Police Officer on Saturday, August 9th.  His family is now seeking justice for Michael’s death.  Their pursuit for justice will be lengthy and hard but with the support of the community they will get justice.  If you are willing to support Michael’s family please donate to Michael Brown’s Memorial Fund.  These funds will assist his family with costs that they will acquire as they seek justice on Michael’s behalf.  All funds will be given to the Michael Brown family.  We appreciate your support.

Donate here.

This is a legitimate fundraiser confirmed by the family’s lawyer’s official twitter account and multiple news sources. This family has suffered so much, please help relieve one small worry from their life.

lora-does-things:

stars-collected:

Michael Brown was an 18 year old that was killed by a Ferguson Police Officer on Saturday, August 9th.  His family is now seeking justice for Michael’s death.  Their pursuit for justice will be lengthy and hard but with the support of the community they will get justice.  If you are willing to support Michael’s family please donate to Michael Brown’s Memorial Fund.  These funds will assist his family with costs that they will acquire as they seek justice on Michael’s behalf.  All funds will be given to the Michael Brown family.  We appreciate your support.

This is a legitimate fundraiser confirmed by the family’s lawyer’s official twitter account and multiple news sources. This family has suffered so much, please help relieve one small worry from their life.

(via 2brwngrls)

It’s so exhausting to follow the discussions that crop up every time an innocent black child is murdered by a cop, mainly because they are so focused on asserting the child’s innocence in the first place. And I get the necessity of this, I really do, but it’s just so frustrating to have to work to establish something that should be automatically assumed. It’s just so unfair to me that people who are hurting have to forsake their own healing and prove why “this black child didn’t deserve to die.” It’s heartbreaking to watch people who would rather be discussing literally any other aspect of this crime, have to devote so much time and energy toward ““Why this black child didn’t deserve to be shot eight times by a cop.” The fact that white people can even ask why the child didn’t deserve it, and we have to entertain them like they’ve posed a legitimate, reasonable question worthy of discussing just makes me so fucking angry. It’s a quiet anger that fills me up but has no where to go, that burns so fucking hot but then leaves me cold. I’m exhausted because I know we’ll be having the same conversation in a few months, weeks, days when another cop kills a young black child. And we’ll be back at a square one that shouldn’t exist in the first place, fighting to make people understand why a child didn’t deserve to die at all.

You took my son away from me,” she told the television news station KMOV. “Do you know how hard it was for me to get him to stay in school and graduate? You know how many black men graduate? Not many. Because you bring them down to this type of level, where they feel like they don’t got nothing to live for anyway. ‘They’re going to try to take me out anyway.’

—Lesley McSpadden, Michael Brown’s mother (via withallsincerity)

yagazieemezi:

My latest instagram candy is teffthedon

This Nigerian artist and blogger (Stephanie Nnamani) drew me in with her personal style and eye for the abstract. Hop on board to see more of her.